See How Easily a Rat Can Wriggle Up Your Toilet | National Geographic

See How Easily a Rat Can Wriggle Up Your Toilet | National Geographic

Август 20, 2015

A rat's ribs are hinged at the spine, enabling it to easily squeeze through the tightest spaces—like the pipes draining your toilet. And rats are great swimmers too; they can hold their breath for up to three minutes. See how quickly a rat can go from the city streets to your bathroom.
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Click here to read more: http://phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2015/08/14/yes-rats-can-swim-up-your-toilet-and-it-gets-worse-than-that/

ASSOCIATE PRODUCER: Jed Winer
NARRATOR: Daniel Stone

See How Easily a Rat Can Wriggle Up Your Toilet | National Geographic
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2:59 Mother Polar Bear, Desperate for Food, Tests Walrus | National Geographic

Mother Polar Bear, Desperate for Food, Tests Walrus | National Geographic

A thin mother polar bear roaming with her critically hungry cub inspects a resting walrus, on the chance that it's sick or dead, but it's quite capable of defending itself.
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Travis Wilkinson and his family were on a sailing trip in Norway's Svalbard archipelago, far north of the Arctic Circle. In late July, 2015, they were traveling through Hinlopen Strait, west of the largest island, Spitsbergen—an impossible route some summers, when pack ice blocks passage. But that summer, ice was especially sparse, making hunting harder for polar bears. These apex predators favor waiting at the sea ice’s edge, striking seals as they approach. A few days earlier, the Wilkinson family had been farther north,  near the ice. There, bears looked healthy. But the scene just after midnight on July 23 was desperate. Mother and cub were struggling, skin hanging loose. According to Jon Aars, of the Norwegian Polar Institute, the cub, seven or eight months old, was likely to die if its mother didn’t eat soon. She probably wasn’t lactating. Wilkinson saw the bear sniff the air, picking up something of interest. This thin female couldn’t attack a healthy, full-grown walrus. A carcass would solve their problem. If the walrus were weak or sick, predation might be an option. But that walrus was alive and well. The situation was unworkable. The search for food went on.

Read more about the polar bear and walrus, "Desperate for Food, Polar Bear Tests Walrus"
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Mother Polar Bear, Desperate for Food, Tests Walrus | National Geographic
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10:48 5 Easy Mouse/Rat Trap

5 Easy Mouse/Rat Trap

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3:57 What Airplane Toilets Do With Your Waste

What Airplane Toilets Do With Your Waste

Modern airplane toilet bowls rely on strong suction and teflon-coated walls to flush—causing waste to accelerate through its pipes faster than a Formula One race car.

From: X-RAY MEGA AIRPORT: Failure is Not an Option
http://bit.ly/1PBpOZy

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22:27 Farmers market lies exposed: hidden camera investigation (Marketplace)

Farmers market lies exposed: hidden camera investigation (Marketplace)

Farmers market lies exposed: hidden camera investigation. Is the produce you're buying at the farmers market grown locally? Marketplace goes on an undercover shopping trip and catches vendors lying about where their produce is grown.

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9:57 We met the world’s first domesticated foxes

We met the world’s first domesticated foxes

This week, we meet the very cute and very bizarre result of an almost 60-year-long experiment: they’re foxes that have been specially bred for their dog-like friendliness toward people. We do a little behavior research of our own, and discover what scientists continue to learn from the world’s most famous experiment in domestication. The fox experiment continues under the supervision of Lyudmila Trut at the Institute of Cytology and Genetics. Her book “How to Tame a Fox (and Build a Dog)”, co-authored by Lee Alan Dugatkin, details the history and science behind the experiment.

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4:44 This man worked undercover in a Chinese iPhone factory

This man worked undercover in a Chinese iPhone factory

Dejian Zeng spent 12 hours a day attaching one screw to iPhones. As part of his summer project, the NYU grad student went undercover for 6 weeks at a Pegatron factory in Shanghai. He lived on-site in a dorm with 7 other people and got to experience what really goes into making the popular mobile device. He tells us what it was like.

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3:42 See How Termites Inspired a Building That Can Cool Itself | National Geographic

See How Termites Inspired a Building That Can Cool Itself | National Geographic

How do you cool a building without air conditioning? Using an approach called biomimicry, see how architect Mick Pearce harnessed the ingenuity of termites to design a natural cooling system for the largest commercial building in Zimbabwe.
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In nature, termites build skyscraper-like mounds that are ventilated by a complex system of tunnels. By emulating the ingenuity of termites, Zimbabwean architect Mick Pearce used an approach called biomimicry to design a natural cooling system that harnessed nature. The result is an architectural marvel that achieves 90 percent passive climate control by taking cool air into the building at night and expelling heat throughout the day.

In this first installation of the Decoder series, see how the Eastgate Centre in Harare, Zimbabwe utilizes a termite-inspired climate control system. To learn more, read "Termite Climate Control" from the May 2018 issue of National Geographic magazine.

See How Termites Inspired a Building That Can Cool Itself | National Geographic
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6:9 Stretchiest skin in the world! - Guinness World Records

Stretchiest skin in the world! - Guinness World Records

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Garry Turner (UK) is able to stretch the skin of his stomach to a distended length of 15.8 cm (6.25 in) due to a rare medical condition called Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, a disorder of the connective tissues affecting the skin, ligaments and internal organs.

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At Guinness World Records we want to show that everyone in the world is the best at something, and we’re here to measure it! Whether you’ve got the stretchiest skin, know the world’s smallest dog or want to create the largest human dominoes chain we want to hear about it.

Here on the Guinness World Records YouTube channel we want to showcase incredible talent. If you're looking for videos featuring the world's tallest, shortest, fastest, longest, oldest and most incredible things on the planet, you're in the right place.

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2:46 Casting a Fire Ant Colony with Molten Aluminum (Cast #043)

Casting a Fire Ant Colony with Molten Aluminum (Cast #043)

An incredible metal structure is made by pouring molten aluminum into a fire ant colony. The resulting cast is huge, weighing 17.9 lbs. and reaching a depth of 18 inches.

Support Anthill Art by donating at Patreon. Any donation amount, no matter how small, is greatly appreciated and will be used to improve the quality and content of the channel. https://www.patreon.com/anthillart

These are the red imported fire ants (RIFA) which are harmful to the environment and their nests are exterminated by the millions in the United States using poisons, gasoline and fire, boiling water, and very rarely molten aluminum.

From Wikipedia: "Researchers have also been experimenting with extreme temperature change to exterminate RIFAs [red imported fire ants], such as injecting liquid nitrogen or pressurized steam into RIFA nests. Besides using hot steam, pouring boiling water into ant mounds has been found effective in exterminating their nests."

I did a casual survey and found that I have at least 120 of these colonies within an area of approximately three acres. http://www.anthillart.com/info/fire-ant-survey/

See detailed pictures of the resulting cast on the Anthill Art website at http://www.anthillart.com/castings/043/

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5:9 Can You Survive Quicksand? | I Didn't Know That

Can You Survive Quicksand? | I Didn't Know That

Is it possible to survive being stuck in quicksand? Jonny Phillips risks life and limb to experience firsthand what it is like to slowly sink into quicksand—just a few feet away from an incoming tide.
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Two industrial scientists, Richard Ambrose and Jonny Phillips, explain the science behind everyday life... from microwave ovens to beating a lie detector.

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Can You Survive Quicksand? | I Didn't Know That
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