Noise Husbandry - with the family

Noise Husbandry - with the family

Январь 30, 2016

Short excerpts of some of the music & sound design from “Noise Husbandry”, my new installation at the Australian National Maritime Museum, with photos of the ultimate test — what did my family think?!

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3:22 Noise Husbandry - with the family

Noise Husbandry - with the family

Short excerpts of some of the music & sound design from “Noise Husbandry”, my new installation at the Australian National Maritime Museum, with photos of the ultimate test — what did my family think?!

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4:35 Mock-up of "Family" for ANMM installation

Mock-up of "Family" for ANMM installation

The final draft of "Family", a movement of "Noise Husbandry". A mock up in Sibelius using NotePerformer samples, EW Spaces reverb and WaveArts Final5 compression.

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11:29 The Story of Milk: Production 1920s Bray Studios

The Story of Milk: Production 1920s Bray Studios

more at http://food.quickfound.net

Very well made film showing how milk is produced.

Public domain film from the Prelinger Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied.

The film was silent. I have added music created by myself using the Reaper Digital Audio Workstation and the Independence and Proteus VX VST instrument plugins.

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dairy_farming

Dairy farming is a class of agricultural, or an animal husbandry, enterprise, for long-term production of milk, usually from dairy cows but also from goats, sheep and camels, which may be either processed on-site or transported to a dairy factory for processing and eventual retail sale.

Most dairy farms sell the male calves born by their cows, usually for veal production, or breeding depending on quality of the bull calf, rather than raising non-milk-producing stock. Many dairy farms also grow their own feed, typically including corn, and hay. This is fed directly to the cows, or is stored as silage for use during the winter season...

Vacuum bucket milking

The first milking machines were an extension of the traditional milking pail. The early milker device fit on top of a regular milk pail and sat on the floor under the cow. Following each cow being milked, the bucket would be dumped into a holding tank. This developed into the Surge hanging milker. Prior to milking a cow, a large wide leather strap called a surcingle was put around the cow, across the cow's lower back. The milker device and collection tank hung underneath the cow from the strap. This innovation allowed the cow to move around naturally during the milking process rather than having to stand perfectly still over a bucket on the floor.

Milking pipeline

The next innovation in automatic milking was the milk pipeline. This uses a permanent milk-return pipe and a second vacuum pipe that encircles the barn or milking parlor above the rows of cows, with quick-seal entry ports above each cow. By eliminating the need for the milk container, the milking device shrank in size and weight to the point where it could hang under the cow, held up only by the sucking force of the milker nipples on the cow's udder. The milk is pulled up into the milk-return pipe by the vacuum system, and then flows by gravity to the milkhouse vacuum-breaker that puts the milk in the storage tank. The pipeline system greatly reduced the physical labor of milking since the farmer no longer needed to carry around huge heavy buckets of milk from each cow.

The pipeline allowed barn length to keep increasing and expanding, but after a point farmers started to milk the cows in large groups, filling the barn with one-half to one-third of the herd, milking the animals, and then emptying and refilling the barn. As herd sizes continued to increase, this evolved into the more efficient milking parlor.

Innovation in milking focused on mechanizing the milking parlor (known in Australia and New Zealand as a milking shed) to maximize the number of cows per operator which streamlined the milking process to permit cows to be milked as if on an assembly line, and to reduce physical stresses on the farmer by putting the cows on a platform slightly above the person milking the cows to eliminate having to constantly bend over. Many older and smaller farms still have tie-stall or stanchion barns, but worldwide a majority of commercial farms have parlors...

In the 1980s and 1990s, robotic milking systems were developed and introduced (principally in the EU)...

Milking machines are held in place automatically by a vacuum system that draws the ambient air pressure down from 15 to 21 pounds per square inch (100 to 140 kPa) of vacuum. The vacuum is also used to lift milk vertically through small diameter hoses, into the receiving can. A milk lift pump draws the milk from the receiving can through large diameter stainless steel piping, through the plate cooler, then into a refrigerated bulk tank.

Milk is extracted from the cow's udder by flexible rubber sheaths known as liners or inflations that are surrounded by a rigid air chamber. A pulsating flow of ambient air and vacuum is applied to the inflation's air chamber during the milking process. When ambient air is allowed to enter the chamber, the vacuum inside the inflation causes the inflation to collapse around the cow's teat, squeezing the milk out of teat in a similar fashion as a baby calf's mouth massaging the teat. When the vacuum is reapplied in the chamber the flexible rubber inflation relaxes and opens up, preparing for the next squeezing cycle.

It takes the average cow three to five minutes to give her milk...

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2:58 The Animal Sounds Song

The Animal Sounds Song

A sweet and fun ANIMAL SOUNDS song! ♫ Children will meet all the animals on the farm as they search for who made the mystery noise. FREE printable Lyrics and Word Search available here: http://www.naturalenglish.org/p/free-materials.html

An original song, written and sung by Tamsin Ambrose. Music by Richard Braithwaite. Pictures by Tamsin Ambrose, animated by Petar Paunchev. Additional sound effects from www.freesound.org.

Rooster:
Tomlija, Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported (CC BY 3.0)
http://freesound.org/people/Tomlija/sounds/100785/

Thank you for watching! Please subscribe for updates. :-)

Copyright © 2014 Tamsin Ambrose, NaturalEnglish.org. All Rights Reserved.

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5:54 Why no aquarium has a great white shark

Why no aquarium has a great white shark

Many have tried to keep a white shark in captivity. Here's why that's so difficult.

There are several aquariums around the world, including one in Georgia, that house whale sharks, the biggest fish in the sea. But not one has a great white shark on display. Aquariums have made dozens of attempts since the 1970s to display a captive great white shark. Most of those attempts ended with dead sharks. By the 2000s, the only group still trying was the Monterey Bay Aquarium, which spent a decade planning its white shark program. In 2004, it acquired a shark that became the first great white to survive in captivity for more than 16 days. In fact, it was on display for more than six months before it was released back into the ocean. In the following years, the Monterey Bay Aquarium hosted five more juvenile white sharks for temporary stays before ending the program in 2011. It was an expensive effort and had come under criticism due to injuries that some of the sharks developed in the tank. Responding to those critics, Jon Hoech, the aquarium's director of husbandry operations, said: "We believe strongly that putting people face to face with live animals like this is very significant in inspiring ocean conservation and connecting people to the ocean environment. We feel like white sharks face a significant threats out in the wild and our ability to bring awareness to that is significant in terms of encouraging people to become ocean stewards." Check out the video above to learn why white sharks are so difficult to keep in captivity and how the Monterey Bay Aquarium designed a program that could keep them alive.

Link to the Biodiversity Heritage Library: https://www.flickr.com/photos/biodivlibrary/albums

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10:30 Chicken Farm: "Poultry on the Farm" 1937 ERPI 11min

Chicken Farm: "Poultry on the Farm" 1937 ERPI 11min

more at http://food.quickfound.net/

"Chickens, ducks, geese and turkeys."

NEW VERSION with improved video & sound: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0kcXIjY1vos

Public domain film from the Library of Congress Prelinger Archive, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied.
The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poultry_farming

Poultry farming is the raising of domesticated birds such as chickens, turkeys, ducks, and geese, for the purpose of farming meat or eggs for food. Poultry are farmed in great numbers with chickens being the most numerous. More than 50 billion chickens are raised annually as a source of food, for both their meat and their eggs. Chickens raised for eggs are usually called laying hens whilst chickens raised for meat are often called broilers. In total, the UK alone consumes over 29 million eggs per day. In the US, the national organization overseeing poultry production is the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). In the UK, the national organisation is the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra).

Intensive and alternative poultry farming

According to the Worldwatch Institute, 74 percent of the world's poultry meat, and 68 percent of eggs are produced in ways that are described as 'intensive'. One alternative to intensive poultry farming is free-range farming, however, this method of husbandry also uses large flock sizes in high stocking densities. Friction between supporters of these two main methods of poultry farming has led to long-term issues of ethical consumerism. Opponents of intensive farming argue that it harms the environment and creates health risks, as well as abusing the animals. Advocates of intensive farming say that their highly efficient systems save land and food resources due to increased productivity, stating that the animals are looked after in state-of-the-art environmentally controlled facilities. The most intensive poultry farming methods are very efficient and allow meat and eggs to be available to the consumer in all seasons at a lower cost than free-range production. Poultry producers routinely use nationally approved medications, such as antibiotics, in feed or drinking water, to treat disease or to prevent disease outbreaks. Some FDA-approved medications are also approved for improved feed utilization.

Egg-laying chickens — husbandry systems

Commercial hens usually begin laying eggs at 16—20 weeks of age, although production gradually declines soon after from approximately 25 weeks of age. This means that in many countries, by approximately 72 weeks of age, flocks are considered economically unviable and are slaughtered after approximately 12 months of egg production, although chickens will naturally live for 6 or more years. In some countries, hens are force moulted to re-invigorate egg-laying.

Environmental conditions are often automatically controlled in egg-laying systems. For example, the duration of the light phase is initially increased to prompt the beginning of egg-laying at 16—20 weeks of age and then mimics summer daylength which stimulates the hens to continue laying all year round; normally, egg production occurs only in the warmer months. Some commercial breeds of hen can produce over 300 eggs a year. Critics argue that year-round egg production stresses the birds more than normal seasonal production.

Free-range poultry farming allows the birds to roam freely for a period of the day, although they are usually confined in sheds at night to protect them from predators or kept indoors if the weather is particularly bad. In the UK, the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) states that a free-range chicken must have daytime access to open-air runs during at least half of its life. Unlike in the United States, this definition also applies to egg laying hens. The European Union regulates marketing standards for egg farming which specifies a minimum condition for free-range eggs that "hens have continuous daytime access to open-air runs, except in the case of temporary restrictions imposed by veterinary authorities". The RSPCA "Welfare standards for laying hens and pullets" indicates that the stocking rate must not exceed 1, 000 birds per hectare (10 m2 per hen) of range available and a minimum area of overhead shade/shelter of 8 m2 per 1, 000 hens must be provided.

Free-range laying hens

Free-range farming of egg-laying hens is increasing its share of the market. Defra figures indicate that 45% of eggs produced in the UK throughout 2010 were free-range, 5% were produced in barn systems and 50% from cages. This compares with 41% being free-range in 2009...

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59:36 About Music Lecture - James Humberstone

About Music Lecture - James Humberstone

Educational practice often lags behind developments in the culture of young people and innovative research in educational research. Political debate about education focuses on the best ways to teach numeracy and literacy, while the arts continue to be sidelined. At the same time, innovative research and related school pilot projects indicate that experiential, culturally relevant education engages children in a myriad of ways and leads to improved educational results across the curriculum. James Humberstone draws on recent research and his own practice to argue that best-practice music education is in the vanguard of all education in the 21st century.

James Humberstone lectures in music education at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music. A passionate educator, composer, musicologist and music technologist, James’s research output crosses all these fields. His most recent work includes a chapter in the forthcoming Handbook of Technology and Music Education (OUP), as well as research into the use of tablet computers in music education and on Malcolm Williamson’s mini-operas for children. He is currently working on ‘Noise Husbandry’, an electro-acoustic installation work for the Australian National Maritime Museum on the battleships in Darling Harbour.

10 August, 2015
Recital Hall West

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11:49 Cattle Ranching: "Herds West" 1955 12min

Cattle Ranching: "Herds West" 1955 12min

more at http://food.quickfound.net/

"Shows production of beef from the grasslands of the range to the feeding barns near big Western cities."

NEW VERSION with improved video & sound: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BCVIjklEThk

Public domain film from the Library of Congress Prelinger Archive, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied.
The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and equalization.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cattle

Cattle (colloquially cows) are the most common type of large domesticated ungulates. They are a prominent modern member of the subfamily Bovinae, are the most widespread species of the genus Bos, and are most commonly classified collectively as Bos primigenius. Cattle are raised as livestock for meat (beef and veal), as dairy animals for milk and other dairy products, and as draft animals (oxen / bullocks) (pulling carts, plows and the like). Other products include leather and dung for manure or fuel. In some countries, such as India, cattle are sacred. It is estimated that there are 1.3 billion cattle in the world today. In 2009, cattle became the first livestock animal to have its genome mapped...

Cattle occupy a unique role in human history, domesticated since at least the early Neolithic. They are raised for meat (beef cattle), dairy products and hides. They are also used as draft animals and in certain sports. Some consider cattle the oldest form of wealth, and cattle raiding consequently one of the earliest forms of theft.

Cattle are often raised by allowing herds to graze on the grasses of large tracts of rangeland. Raising cattle in this manner allows the use of land that might be unsuitable for growing crops. The most common interactions with cattle involve daily feeding, cleaning and milking. Many routine husbandry practices involve ear tagging, dehorning, loading, medical operations, vaccinations and hoof care, as well as training for agricultural shows and preparations. There are also some cultural differences in working with cattle- the cattle husbandry of Fulani men rests on behavioural techniques, whereas in Europe cattle are controlled primarily by physical means like fences. Breeders use cattle husbandry to reduce M. bovis infection susceptibility by selective breeding and maintaining herd health to avoid concurrent disease.[

Cattle are farmed for beef, veal, dairy, leather and they are less commonly used for conservation grazing, simply to maintain grassland for wildlife — for example, in Epping Forest, England. They are often used in some of the most wild places for livestock. Depending on the breed, cattle can survive on hill grazing, heaths, marshes, moors and semi desert. Modern cows are more commercial than older breeds and, having become more specialized, are less versatile. For this reason many smaller farmers still favor old breeds, like the dairy breed of cattle Jersey.

In Portugal, Spain, Southern France and some Latin American countries, bulls are used in the activity of bullfighting; a similar activity, Jallikattu, is seen in South India; in many other countries this is illegal. Other activities such as bull riding are seen as part of a rodeo, especially in North America. Bull-leaping, a central ritual in Bronze Age Minoan culture (see Bull (mythology)), still exists in southwestern France. In modern times, cattle are also entered into agricultural competitions. These competitions can involve live cattle or cattle carcases in hoof and hook events.

In terms of food intake by humans, consumption of cattle is less efficient than of grain or vegetables with regard to land use, and hence cattle grazing consumes more area than such other agricultural production when raised on grains.[ Nonetheless, cattle and other forms of domesticated animals can sometimes help to use plant resources in areas not easily amenable to other forms of agriculture...

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41:6 Foie Gras & the Ethics of Force-Feeding: The Politics of Food

Foie Gras & the Ethics of Force-Feeding: The Politics of Food

In 2012, the State of California successfully banned foie gras, citing animal welfare and health concerns. Though that ban was just recently overturned, the debate continues to rage on from both sides.

In this episode of The Politics of Food, chef and food writer Dave Arnold speaks to the ban's key political players, including the Chairman of the California Democratic Party, to understand how insider politics determines what we can and cannot eat. From a foie gras speakeasy to the world of animal-rights activists, Dave visits both sides of the issue and discovers why there’s so much controversy surrounding this popular delicacy.

More MUNCHIES Politics of Food:
Cypriot Songbird Massacre — http://bit.ly/POF-Songbird
Guantanamo Bay’s Kitchen — http://bit.ly/POF-Guantanamo-Bay
An Apple That Tastes Like a Grape — http://bit.ly/POF-Grapple

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