Ukrainian speaking bison in Alberta.

Ukrainian speaking bison in Alberta.

Январь 4, 2012

Bison running towards the man, when he calls them in Ukrainian language. Tame Bison in Alberta. Bison herd. Bison close up. One of the herd.

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19:58 Ukainian speaking about bison

Ukainian speaking about bison

Ukrainian in Alberta speaking about his
bison herd.

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15:9 Ukrainian speaking Ukrainian in Alberta.

Ukrainian speaking Ukrainian in Alberta.

Ukrainian men telling story how he came to Canada.

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3:17 How scientists brought bison back to Banff

How scientists brought bison back to Banff

In our NewsHour Shares moment of the day, bison have returned to Canada's Banff National Park after being wiped out more than a century ago. A biologist explains the efforts to help anchor a herd to its new home.

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4:41 Bison vs Grizzly Bear - Wild Animal Interaction

Bison vs Grizzly Bear - Wild Animal Interaction

Bison vs grizzly bear. Buffalo vs grizzly bear. Bisons meeting grizzly bear — who will run away?

The American bison (Bison bison), also commonly known as the American buffalo or simply buffalo, is a North American species of bison that once roamed the grasslands of North America in massive herds. They became nearly extinct by a combination of commercial hunting and slaughter in the 19th century and introduction of bovine diseases from domestic cattle, and have made a recent resurgence largely restricted to a few national parks and reserves. Their historical range roughly comprised a triangle between the Great Bear Lake in Canada's far northwest, south to the Mexican states of Durango and Nuevo León, and east to the Atlantic Seaboard of the United States (nearly to the Atlantic tidewater in some areas) from New York to Georgia and per some sources down to Florida. Bison were seen in North Carolina near Buffalo Ford on the Catawba River as late as 1750.
Two subspecies or ecotypes have been described: the plains bison, smaller in size and with a more rounded hump, and the wood bison (B. b. athabascae)—the larger of the two and having a taller, square hump. Furthermore, the plains bison has been suggested to consist of a northern (B. b. montanae) and a southern subspecies, bringing the total to three. However, this is generally not supported. The wood bison is one of the largest wild species of bovid in the world, surpassed by only the Asian gaur and wild water buffalo. It is the largest extant land animal in the Americas.

The grizzly bear, less commonly known as the silvertip bear, is a large subspecies of brown bear inhabiting North America.
The grizzly bear is, by nature, a long-living animal. The average lifespan for a male is estimated at 22 years, with that of a female being slightly longer at 26. Females live longer than males due to their less dangerous life; avoiding the seasonal breeding fights in which males engage. The oldest wild inland grizzly was 34 years old in Alaska; the oldest coastal bear was 39, but most grizzlies die in their first few years of life from predation or hunting. Captive grizzlies have lived as long as 44 years.
Grizzlies are considered more aggressive compared to black bears when defending themselves and their offspring. Unlike the smaller black bears, adult grizzlies do not climb trees well and respond to danger by standing their ground and warding off their attackers. Mothers defending cubs are the most prone to attacking, and are responsible for 70% of humans killed by grizzlies.
A sign at a BC Park warns campers to hang food, garbage, and toiletries out of reach of bears, or to use a secure bear cache.
Grizzly bears normally avoid contact with people. In spite of their obvious physical advantage they rarely actively hunt humans. Most grizzly bear attacks result from a bear that has been surprised at very close range, especially if it has a supply of food to protect, or female grizzlies protecting their offspring.
Increased human–bear interaction has created "problem bears": bears adapted to human activities or habitat. Aversive conditioning using rubber bullets, foul-tasting chemicals, or acoustic deterrent devices attempt to condition bears to associate humans with unpleasantness, but is ineffectual when bears have already learned to positively associate humans with food. Such bears are translocated or killed because they pose a threat to humans. The B.C. government kills approximately 50 problem bears each year and overall spends more than one million dollars annually to address bear complaints, relocate bears and kill them.
Grizzly bears are especially dangerous because of the force of their bite, which has been measured at over 8 megapascals (1160 psi). It has been estimated that a bite from a grizzly could even crush a bowling ball.

All information according to www.wikipedia.org

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5:53 Family lives with a Bison called 'Wild Thing' inside their house

Family lives with a Bison called 'Wild Thing' inside their house

Longtime rancher Ron Bridges said they kept Wild Thing for his son to train and he ended up becoming a house pet.

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4:49 Hungry Wolf Attacks Baby Bison in Front of the Mother

Hungry Wolf Attacks Baby Bison in Front of the Mother

Fearless wolf attacks bison calf in presence of the mother. Bison vs bison. Bison vs grizzly bear. Bison vs wolf.

The gray wolf or grey wolf, also known as the timber wolf or western wolf, is a canine native to the wilderness and remote areas of Eurasia and North America. It is the largest extant member of its family, with males averaging 43–45 kg (95–99 lb), and females 36–38.5 kg (79–85 lb). Like the red wolf, it is distinguished from other Canis species by its larger size and less pointed features, particularly on the ears and muzzle. Its winter fur is long and bushy, and predominantly a mottled gray in color, although nearly pure white, red, or brown to black also occur. The gray wolf is the second most specialised member of the genus Canis, after the Ethiopian wolf, as demonstrated by its morphological adaptations to hunting large prey, its more gregarious nature, and its highly advanced expressive behavior. It is nonetheless closely related enough to smaller Canis species, such as the eastern wolf, coyote, and golden jackal to produce fertile hybrids. It is the only species of Canis to have a range encompassing both the Old and New Worlds, and originated in Eurasia during the Pleistocene, colonizing North America on at least three separate occasions during the Rancholabrean. It is a social animal, travelling in nuclear families consisting of a mated pair, accompanied by the pair's adult offspring. The gray wolf is typically an apex predator throughout its range, with only humans and tigers posing a serious threat to it. It feeds primarily on large ungulates, though it also eats smaller animals, livestock, carrion, and garbage. The gray wolf is one of the world's best known and well researched animals, with probably more books written about it than any other wildlife species. It has a long history of association with humans, having been despised and hunted in most pastoral communities because of its attacks on livestock, while conversely being respected in some agrarian and hunter-gatherer societies.Although the fear of wolves is pervasive in many human societies, the majority of recorded attacks on people have been attributed to animals suffering from rabies. Non-rabid wolves have attacked and killed people, mainly children, but this is rare, as wolves are relatively few, live away from people, and have developed a fear of humans from hunters and shepherds. The gray wolf is the largest extant member of the Canidae, excepting certain large breeds of domestic dog.

The American bison (Bison bison), also commonly known as the American buffalo or simply buffalo, is a North American species of bison that once roamed the grasslands of North America in massive herds. They became nearly extinct by a combination of commercial hunting and slaughter in the 19th century and introduction of bovine diseases from domestic cattle, and have made a recent resurgence largely restricted to a few national parks and reserves. Their historical range roughly comprised a triangle between the Great Bear Lake in Canada's far northwest, south to the Mexican states of Durango and Nuevo León, and east to the Atlantic Seaboard of the United States (nearly to the Atlantic tidewater in some areas) from New York to Georgia and per some sources down to Florida. Bison were seen in North Carolina near Buffalo Ford on the Catawba River as late as 1750. Two subspecies or ecotypes have been described: the plains bison, smaller in size and with a more rounded hump, and the wood bison (B. b. athabascae)—the larger of the two and having a taller, square hump. Furthermore, the plains bison has been suggested to consist of a northern (B. b. montanae) and a southern subspecies, bringing the total to three. However, this is generally not supported. The wood bison is one of the largest wild species of bovid in the world, surpassed by only the Asian gaur and wild water buffalo. It is the largest extant land animal in the Americas. A bison has a shaggy, long, dark-brown winter coat, and a lighter-weight, lighter-brown summer coat. As is typical in ungulates, the male bison is slightly larger than the female and, in some cases, can be considerably heavier. Plains bison are often in the smaller range of sizes, and wood bison in the larger range. Head-and-body lengths range from 2 to 3.5 m (6.6 to 11.5 ft) long, the tail adding 30 to 91 cm (12 to 36 in). Shoulder heights in the species can range from 152 to 186 cm (60 to 73 in). Weights can range from 318 to 1, 000 kg.

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2:38 Standing Rock: Thousands of Wild Buffalo Appear Out of Nowhere

Standing Rock: Thousands of Wild Buffalo Appear Out of Nowhere

Buffalo appear at standing rock amidst the ongoing protest against North Dakota Pipeline. Native indian Indegenous people and activists were highly encouraged after wild Buffalo herd sighting.

Native Americans maintain a spiritual tradition with bison, believing that as long as buffalo — a gift from the Great Spirit — roam free and as long as the herds are bountiful, the sovereignty of indigenous people would remain strong.

Indigenous culture honors American bison (known as Tatanka Oyate, or Buffalo Nation) as a symbol of sacrifice, as the bison give their lives to provide food, shelter, and clothing through the use of their meat and their hides.

Native Americans attempting to stop a pipeline from being built on their land and water just got assistance from a large herd of wild buffalo.

Source: usuncut

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1:26 Bison kill an Elk to help a wolf to eat

Bison kill an Elk to help a wolf to eat

Truly fascinating, Bison buffalo kill a female Elk who was trying to hide in their herd for protection, they gored her to death.

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15:17 America's Wildest Places - National Bison Range Complex, Montana

America's Wildest Places - National Bison Range Complex, Montana

From a population of 30 to 60 million animals roaming throughout North America, bison reached a low of 100 in the wild in the late 1800's. Since 1908, the National Bison Range has played an important role in the successful recovery of these magnificent animals. The fact that we can still see bison on the landscape is one of the finest accomplishments in the history of the National Wildlife Refuge System.

The National Bison Range Complex located in northwest Montana is base for a staffed refuge — National Bison Range and 2 unstaffed refuges — Ninepipe and Pablo NWRs.

NATIONAL BISON RANGE
President Theodore Roosevelt established the National Bison Range on May 23, 1908 when he signed legislation authorizing funds to purchase suitable land for the conservation of bison. Today, 350-500 bison call this refuge home.

The Refuge is essentially a small, low-rolling mountain connected to the Mission Mountain Range by a gradually descending spur. Much of the National Bison Range was once under prehistoric Glacial Lake Missoula, which was formed about 13, 000 to 18, 000 years ago. Today, the National Bison Range is a diverse ecosystem of grasslands, Douglas fir and ponderosa pine forests, riparian areas and ponds. In addition to herds of bison, it supports populations of Rocky Mountain elk, mule deer, white-tailed deer, pronghorn, and bighorn sheep as well as coyotes, mountain lions, bears, bobcat and over 200 species of birds.

Bison and humans have coexisted for a very long time. In North America, flint spear points as old as 1200 years have been found among bison bones. Native Americans hunted for meat as well as for hides for clothing and shelter. And bison were able to furnish much more — sinew used for bowstrings, hooves boiled to make glue, dung burned as fuel, and toe bones used like dice. The relationship with bison formed the basis of many Plains Indian beliefs, stories and religions.

NINEPIPE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE & PABLO NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE
In the Mission Valley of Northwest Montana, the NWRs were established as a refuge and breeding ground for native birds. The wetland habitat supports abundant waterfowl species such as mallards, northern shovelers, gadwalls, redheads and ruddy ducks. It has become an important breeding and staging area for a large portion of the Flathead Valley Canada goose population. Red-necked grebes nest on the refuge, and the refuge also contains the Valley's only nesting western grebe colony. Other birds include song sparrows, yellow headed and red winged blackbirds, and ring necked pheasants. American bitterns and sora rails can often be seen and heard. Osprey nest on platforms on the south shore of the refuge. There is an active rookery of great blue herons and double crested cormorants. Grizzly bears will sometimes move down from the Mission Mountains to forage on the refuge.

TRAVEL & TOURISM
Visitors are welcome year-round to the National Bison Range. Recreation is geared toward wildlife-oriented activities and the Bison Range is well-known for its incredible wildlife viewing and photographic opportunities. The primary means of access is by vehicle with some limited walking trails. In general, the longer and steeper Red Sleep Mountain Drive is open from mid-May to early October with the shorter Winter Drive open the remainder of the season. The Visitor Center, with displays, restrooms and bookstore, is typically open daily from mid-May to early October but has limited hours during the winter season.

Directions:
The National Bison Range is located in the Mission Valley of Northwest Montana.

From the south, take Highway 93 north to Ravalli, turning west on Highway 200 to Highway 212. Travel north on Highway 212 for 5 miles to the entrance.

From the north, take Highway 93 south of Polson for 18 miles to State Highway 212; travel 12 miles to the entrance.

From the west, turn north off Interstate 90 onto Highway 135 at St. Regis. Turn east at Highway 200 to Highway 212 just east of Dixon. Travel north on Highway 212 for 5 miles to the entrance.

GPS coordinates to Front Gate: N47 22.338 W114 15.807
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4:10 Baby Bison Takes on Wolf and Wins | America's National Parks

Baby Bison Takes on Wolf and Wins | America's National Parks

After being swept away from his herd while crossing the Lamar River, a bison calf defies all odds in order to survive.
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Baby Bison Takes on Wolf and Wins | America's National Parks
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